Are toucans endangered?

Deforestation, area cleared for treesMost of the toucan species are considered to be a stable population trend, while none of them are considered endangered or threatened with extinction,but some could be if trade is not closely controlled.

The Wild Bird Conservation Act ensures that exotic bird species are not harmed by international trade. Birds listed under WBCA include most bird species listed under the Conservation on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

CITES is an international agreement between governments.

CITES Appendix I lists species that are threatened with extinction. International trade is prohibited in specimens of these species except when the purpose of the import is not commercial, for instance scientific research. No toucans are included in this list.

CITES Appendix II lists species that are not necessarily now threatened with extinction but that may become so unless trade is closely controlled. It also includes so-called “look-alike” species. International trades in specimens of Appendix-II species may be authorized by the granting of an export permit or re-export certificate. No import permit is necessary for these species under CITES (although a permit is needed in some countries that have taken stricter measures than CITES requires).

The following toucans are included in this list:

Pteroglossus viridis

Pteroglossus viridis

Ramphastos sulfuratus

Ramphastos sulfuratus

Ramphastos toco

Ramphastos toco

Ramphastos vitellinus

Ramphastos vitellinus

Ramphastos tucanus

Ramphastos tucanus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CITES Appendix III lists species included at the request of a party that already regulates trade in the species and that needs the cooperation of other countries to prevent unsustainable or illegal exploitation. International trade in specimens of species listed in this Appendix is allowed only on presentation of the appropriate permits or certificates.

Species included in this list are the following:

Baillonius bailloni (Argentina)

Baillonius bailloni (Argentina)

Pteroglossus castanotis (Argentina)

Pteroglossus castanotis (Argentina)

Ramphastos dicolorus (Argentina)

Ramphastos dicolorus (Argentina)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most species need undisturbed forest.

Habitat loss due to logging and agriculture is a problem because it removes important sources of fruit.

Roads being built through the forest could isolate populations because toucans don’t like to cross wide open spaces.

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